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Apr 05, 2021

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The state is working with Nevada’s local health departments, hospitals and clinics to distribute vaccines as they become available.

If you have questions about the vaccine, please visit https://www.immunizenevada.org/nv-covid-fighter for statewide information and https://covid.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/vaccine/ for southern Nevada information. You can also call 800-401-0946. 

As of April 5, all Nevadans aged 16 and older are eligible to schedule vaccination appointments statewide. 

Appointment availability may be limited for the first few weeks based on dose allocation provided by the federal government, and State officials encourage Nevadans to be patient with the process.  

Visit https://covid.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/ for more information. 

The information provided on this page is from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Immunize Nevada and the Southern Nevada Health District (SNHD).  

Vaccine 101

How does it work?

From the CDC:

COVID-19 vaccines help our bodies develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 without us having to get the illness. Different types of vaccines work in different ways to offer protection, but with all types of vaccines, the body is left with a supply of “memory” T-lymphocytes as well as B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus in the future.

It typically takes a few weeks for the body to produce T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes after vaccination. Therefore, it is possible that a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and then get sick because the vaccine did not have enough time to provide protection.

Sometimes after vaccination, the process of building immunity can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building immunity.

Does it  give you the virus?

From Immunize Nevada:

No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines or COVID-19 vaccines currently in development in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

There are several different types of vaccines in development. All of them teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.

Does it prevent you from getting the virus?

From SNHD:

Based on what we know about how vaccines work, experts believe that getting a COVID-19 vaccine may help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19.

If I had coronavirus, should I still get the vaccine or do I have immunity?

From the CDC:

Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and the fact that re-infection with COVID-19 is possible, vaccine should be offered to you regardless of whether you already had COVID-19 infection.

At this time, experts do not know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called natural immunity, varies from person to person. Some early evidence suggests natural immunity may not last very long.

We won’t know how long immunity produced by vaccination lasts until we have more data on how well the vaccines work.

Both natural immunity and vaccine-induced immunity are important aspects of COVID-19 that experts are trying to learn more about, and CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.

Is there a difference between the first and second doses?

From Immunize Nevada:

The approved Pfizer-BioNTec vaccine and the Moderna vaccine in the United States require two shots to be fully effective. 

Dr. Jeffrey Murawsky, MD explains why you need two doses in this video

Why are we being ask to continue to wear a mask and social distance after receiving the vaccine?

From Immunize Nevada:

Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools available. Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Other steps, like covering your mouth and nose with a mask and physical distancing, help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

From SNHD:

Wearing a mask is still recommended during the pandemic. We do know that the vaccine has been shown to protect the people who receive it; however, we do not have enough information to know if it protects those who haven’t been vaccinated. It is important to continue to wear a mask that covers your nose and mouth when in contact with others outside your household, when you are in a health care facility, and when receiving any vaccine, including a COVID-19 vaccine. For more information, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has more information at Considerations for Wearing Masks.

How long will the vaccine last/ be effective?

From SNHD:

We won’t know how long immunity lasts after vaccination until we have more data on how well COVID-19 vaccines work in real-world conditions.

Experts are working to learn more about both natural immunity and vaccine-induced immunity. CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.

Experts also do not know what percentage of people would need to get vaccinated to achieve herd immunity to COVID-19 at this time. Herd immunity (community immunity) is a term used to describe when enough people have protection—either from previous infection or vaccination—that it is unlikely a virus or bacteria can spread and cause disease. As a result, everyone within the community is protected even if some people don’t have any protection themselves. The percentage of people who need to have protection in order to achieve community immunity varies by disease.

Addressing Concerns

Is it safe?

Both vaccines available have been shown to be safe and effective. Visit the CDC’s Vaccine Safety page for detailed information.

Since kids aren’t getting it, how can you protect your children? What’s the recommendation for parents?

SNHD’s Director of Clinical Services JoAnn Rupiper advises those who are eligible to receive the vaccine to do so in order to protect the children they are around.

I’m pregnant. Do I get it or wait until I’m breastfeeding?

From the CDC:

CDC and the independent Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) have provided information to assist pregnant people with their decision to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. At this time, ACIP recommends that certain groups (e.g., healthcare personnel, followed by other frontline essential workers) are offered vaccination during the first months of the COVID-19 vaccination program. People who are pregnant and part of a group recommended to receive the COVID-19 vaccine may choose to be vaccinated. If they have questions about getting vaccinated, a discussion with a healthcare provider might help them make an informed decision.

Visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations/pregnancy.html for more information. 

What would you tell people who don’t want to get the vaccine?

Here are three reasons to get the vaccine from SNHD:

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SNHD’s Director of Clinical Services JoAnn Rupiper also asks that people think about what they want to do – travel, etc, - as it may be required before doing certain things.

Availability

The state of Nevada receives an allocation of vaccines from the federal government each week. The state can only distribute vaccines as they become available.

View Southern Nevada Health District’s Vaccine Snapshot.

Eligibility

View the  list of who is currently eligible to receive the vaccine in Southern Nevada.

To find out when you can be vaccinated check out your counties plan at NVCOVIDFighter.orgnevada211.org or Call 211 or 1-866-535-5654.

Where can I go to get the vaccine?

If you are currently eligible in southern Nevada, you can view the vaccine locations and make appointments at https://covid.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/vaccine/distribution/. Please note that appointment slots are only available 72 hours in advance.

Will certain industries be prioritized in Las Vegas? When can I get it?

Learn more about the prioritization lanes by viewing the Nevada COVID-19 Vaccine Playbook Brief.

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How will residents be notified when more people become eligible?

Residents are encouraged to visit https://www.immunizenevada.org/nv-covid-fighter for statewide information and https://covid.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/vaccine/ for Southern Nevada information. You can also call 800-401-0946 for the latest information.

Appointments

I’m currently eligible. Where and how can I make an appointment?

If you are currently eligible in southern Nevada, you can view the vaccine locations and make appointments at https://covid.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/vaccine/distribution/. Please note that appointment slots are only available 72 hours in advance.

Use Immunize Nevada’s Vaccine Locator page to find statewide locations.

I really want one, but am currently not eligible. Is there a sign up form?

Individuals and employers interested in the COVID-19 vaccine can complete the form at https://dpbhrdc.nv.gov/redcap/surveys/?s=N7ACTF4CYL

How can I find out about available appointments and vaccination locations?

If you are currently eligible in southern Nevada, you can view the vaccine locations and make appointments at https://covid.southernnevadahealthdistrict.org/vaccine/distribution/. Please note that appointment slots are only available 72 hours in advance.

Use Immunize Nevada’s Vaccine Locator page to find statewide locations.


Watch our conversation with southern Nevada Health District’s Director of Clinical Services JoAnn Rupiper:

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